Host your business event at the Roman Baths & Pump Room

Speeches beside the Great Bath, Soul Media
Dinner in Pump Room, Harvey and Harvey Photography
Meeting in the Kingston Room
Introducing the Roman Baths & Pump Room

The Roman Baths & Pump Room have always been at the social heart of the city and continue to be one of the most popular venues in the region.

If you are looking to wow your guests and offer them an unforgettable evening, the history, atmosphere and great service at the Roman Baths & Pump Room will tick all the boxes. There are different areas within the building that can be used independently or the whole complex can be hired exclusively for larger events.

PERFECTLY SUITED TO
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Dinners
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Drinks receptions
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Meetings
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Incentive events
WITH CAPACITY FOR
Capacity
Theatre style 300
Capacity
Dinner with dancing 160
Capacity
Dinner no dancing 200
Capacity
Drinks reception 320
Call

Call us on 01225 477786 or fill out our quick enquiry form to get started.

Virtual Tour
Call

We would be delighted to show you around our venue and you can book in for a face to face or virtual venue visit. We will join you on a live or virtual tour, answer your questions, and highlight the key points of interest relevant to your event. Email [email protected] to get started.

Torchlit Great Bath, Amy Sanders
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Torchlit Great Bath, Amy Sanders
Supporting you

With our help your event can be both enjoyable and hugely rewarding.

We know that hosting a meeting or large dinner, with delegates from far and wide has the potential to be a stressful and time-consuming affair. Let us take the strain - our team has extensive experience and has previously worked with associations, corporate and government clients including:

Contact our planning team to discuss your event
The Pump Room, Andy Fletcher
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The Pump Room, Andy Fletcher
What are you organising?

This iconic venue is the perfect choice for a memorable business event and can be exclusively yours.

Dinners & receptions

The atmospheric and award-winning Roman Baths & Pump Room is the perfect venue for drinks receptions and dinners.

KEY FEATURES
Capacity
Drinks receptions for up to 300 guests
Capacity
Dinners from 20 to 180 guests
Capacity
Combine rooms to accommodate 300 guests for dinner
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Ideal for incentive events
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Music and dancing until 1am
Call

For dinner and drinks reception enquiries please call us on 01225 477786 or fill out our quick enquiry form.

With origins dating back 2000 years, this is a magical setting that will delight and fascinate your guests. The flexible spaces available ensure that this venue is ideal for events both large and small.

Venue plan, pricing & capacities

Roman Baths and Pump Room venue plan
Terrace & Reception Hall
From £1,405 inc VAT
With its spectacular view over the Great Bath, the enclosed Terrace is a more intimate alternative to the Pump Room with an incredible atmosphere. While the space can accommodate up to 80 guests, it is most frequently used for smaller gatherings. The large Reception Hall adjoins the Terrace and the two spaces can be linked for larger groups if a dance floor and bar are needed for the evening.
Capacity
Up to 80 guests for dinner on the Terrace
Capacity
Dinners using both Terrace & Reception Hall, 160 guests
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Available from 7pm (September to mid-June)
Roman Baths
From £1400 inc. VAT
After the visitor attraction closes; the Roman Baths become a tranquil and otherworldly location for drinks and canapés. Your guests can socialise and relax beside the Great Bath, standing on the ancient paving and absorbing the history of this vast ruin. Although outdoors, the venue is sheltered from the elements, and in winter the steam from the thermal waters is at its most spectacular. The Roman Baths may be hired for stand-alone drinks receptions, or prior to a dinner or party in the Pump Room, Terrace or Reception Hall.
Capacity
Up to 300 guests for a drinks reception
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Available from 7pm, from September to June
Pump Room
From £2240 inc. VAT
The elegant Pump Room has been a centre for socialising since Georgian times and continues to attract a variety of events including dinners and parties. With its glittering chandelier, spa water fountain and lofty ceilings, it remains one of the most impressive rooms in the city. A stage and discreet PA system are perfect for speeches and the dimmable lighting creates a relaxed atmosphere.
Capacity
Up to 200 for dinner, 300 people for drinks reception
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Available from 8pm

Planning & catering information

Whilst you concentrate on creating your perfect dinner guestlist, we will complete a full venue and catering checklist including:

  • Bespoke room set up requirements in CAD, including furniture, AV
  • Timings to guarantee your event flows and guests have a great time
  • Supplier logistics
  • Accurate guest numbers noting any guest requirements
  • Full menu planning with dietary requirements

We can also:

  • Help you design a bespoke event tailored to your individual needs, or those of your client
  • Suggest additional services and suppliers from photographers to entertainers

Equipment included in venue hire
Included as part of your venue hire fee is comprehensive AV, staging, easels, lecterns and all furniture. Contact us for more details.

Catering
At the Roman Baths & Pump Room all food and beverages are provided by our contracted caterers Searcys. Founded in 1847, Searcys cater in a whole host of historic venues, including Blenheim Palace, Inner Temple and Vinters’ Hall. With their excellent reputation, innovative menus, and use of the finest local ingredients, Searcys are the perfect choice for any event.

We work very closely with Searcys’ professional and dedicated staff and together, we will guide you through every detailed step of the journey to ensure your event runs smoothly.  Whether you are looking for an informal drinks reception with canapés, or a dinner for 200 guests, Searcys will discuss every element of the food and drink in order to deliver your preferred, bespoke menu. Their experienced and competent team of professional chefs and service staff will provide peace of mind and a seamless service.

Dinner menus start from £40.50 + VAT per person.

Last Minute Events
We often have late availability and are experienced at managing bookings with short lead times.  Don’t hesitate to contact us with your requirements and we will do our best to help.  A short lead time will not compromise the quality of your event in one of our venues.

Location
Our city centre location means we are easily accessible via public transport (both train and park and ride bus) and within a short walking distance of various long and short stay car parks.  Bath also boasts an enviable selection of hotels, B&Bs and self-catering accommodation, suited to a variety of tastes and budgets, all just a stones thrown away.

Call

For more assistance please call 01225 477786 or visit our useful planning information page.

For catering enquiries, please contact our caterers Searcys on 01225 444477.

Meetings

Two inspiring meeting rooms are available at the Pump Room in the centre of Bath.

KEY FEATURES
Capacity
Meetings for up to 40 delegates
Capacity
Boardroom meeting room suitable for 25 delegates
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Natural daylight, full blackout, Wi-Fi, projector and screen
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Central location, 5 minutes walk to train station
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Reduced rail fares to Bath
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Full day or part day hire sessions

For meeting enquiries please call us on 01225 477786 or fill out our quick enquiry form.

Elegant yet intimate with inspiring views over to Bath Abbey, the Kingston Room and Drawing Room are lovely spaces perfect for meetings. Whilst they are typically used together, with a small meeting in one and refreshments in the other, they can be hired independently. 

Venue plan, pricing & capacities

Roman Baths and Pump Room venue plan
Drawing Room
From £325 inc vat
Next door to the Kingston Room, the Drawing Room is a lovely choice for refreshments.
Capacity
Theatre: up to 40
Boardroom: up to 25
Kingston Room
From £325 inc vat
This elegant room overlooks Bath Abbey.
Capacity
Theatre: up to 40
Capacity
Boardroom: up to 25

Planning & catering information

Our team are always on hand to discuss any specific requirements you may have to ensure your meeting runs perfectly.

If your delegates would like to visit the museum, we can offer preferential ticket rates for those attending an event in these rooms. Please contact us for more information.

Catering

Searcys seasonal day delegate menus, for meetings and events, are bursting with fresh produce to energise and satisfy hungry appetites and minds throughout the day. With fruit burst muffins and smoothies along with delicious meat and vegetarian menus, wholefood salad bar and fresh fruit pots, you'll be spoilt for choice. The menu is available for meetings in the Kingston and Drawing Rooms.

Searcys Feel-Good Conferencing Menu starts from £26 + VAT per person.

Alternatively, smaller groups may prefer to dine in the Pump Room restaurant following a meeting.

Call

Please contact us on 01225 477786 if you'd like more information.

For catering queries please call Searcys on 01225 444477.

Why choose Bath

Bath is a stunning city and a fantastic destination for a variety of business events, where delegates and guests can enjoy the rich mix of culture, history and leisure facilities.

Luxuriate in the natural hot springs at Thermae Bath Spa, indulge in boutique shopping, sports events or discover quirky bars and restaurants on Bath's cobbled streets. All of this, only 85 minutes from London and 65 minutes from Cardiff. 

View our short film for a taste of what you can expect at the Roman Baths & Assembly Rooms.

Abbey skyline view
FIVE REASONS TO BRING YOUR NEXT BUSINESS EVENT TO BATH
Don’t overlook Bath when you are planning your next business event. It might be small, but it’s perfectly formed, welcoming and business focused.

Speak to our helpful team and learn more about this incredible venue. Complete our enquiry form or call us on 01225 477786.

Discounted train fares

Find out about discounted train fares on GWR for conference attendees.

It is always a pleasure working with you, you make my life so much easier...nothing is ever too much trouble and all done with a smile.
Knorr-Bremse Rail Systems (UK) Ltd, January 2020
Haile Selassie visits the Roman Baths
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Haile Selassie visits the Roman Baths
Venue history

Discover the rich history of the Roman Baths where the continuous gush of hot mineral water, bursting from the ground, has always been a subject of wonder.

Or find out more about the Pump Room, Bath's most iconic 18th century building.

Roman Baths history

The water we see in the Baths today fell as rain on the Mendip Hills many hundreds or even thousands of years ago.  It percolates deep down through limestone aquifers, heated by the earth's core and raising the temperature to between 64 -96 degrees.  Under pressure the heated water rises to the surface at 46 degrees along fissures and faults through the limestone beneath Bath.

By the first century AD this part of Britain was occupied by an Iron Age tribe called the Dobunni.  They believed that the hot spring was sacred to the Goddess Sulis who was thought to possess curative powers.  In AD43 the Roman armies invaded Britain and by AD75 they had built a new religious spa complex around the thermal spring and the settlement then grew as a centre for health and pilgrimage. It was named Aquae Sulis meaning ‘the waters of Sulis’.  To keep good relations with local people the Romans were sensitive to their gods and goddesses and the goddess worshipped at the temple here was known as Sulis Minerva combining Celtic and Roman elements.

The Romans built the baths using the 1.3 million litres of naturally-heated water that rose to the surface naturally each day. The baths combined healing with leisure and water was channelled through the baths using lead pipes and lead lined channels. Even the baths were lined with lead. People came from far and wide to bathe in the waters and worship at the temple.

In the fourth century, barbarian raids from Northern Europe and Ireland and political instability in the Roman Empire made trade and travel increasingly difficult.  The number of visitors to Aquae Sulis declined, and at the same time flooding from the River Avon resulting from poor maintenance meant black mud began to cover everything.  The Temple buildings collapsed and the roofs of the baths eventually crashed into the growing swamp.

By the twelfth century the King’s Bath, formed within the shell of the Roman reservoir chamber, was enclosed within the precincts of the post- Roman monastery.  Medical practice promoted bathing in the thermal waters to cure ailments as belief in its power re-emerged in the legend of the prehistoric Prince Bladud:  in the ninth century BC, it was said Bladud contracted leprosy but was cured by the thermal waters of Bath.

In the late seventeenth century doctors began recommending drinking the water as a remedy for internal conditions and the first Pump Room, opened in 1706, placed drinking prescribed quantities of the water at the heart of the emerging spa culture. 

In 1878, the city surveyor architect Major Charles Davis, worried by a leak from the King's Bath spring, decided to explore the ground around it.  In doing so he found Roman remains and by 1880 had uncovered large parts of the Great Bath. The site was opened to visitors in 1897 and throughout the 20th century was progressively extended, notably with the east baths in the 1920s and later when the Temple Precinct was excavated beneath the Pump Room in 1981-83. A new learning centre will be opened up for the public in an area of Roman remains to the south of the site, where several underground vaults and tunnels lead into some currently inaccessible remains from the Roman bath house and town.

View of Great Bath 1887
Roman Ladies, 1925

Pump Room history

The practice of drinking the thermal waters of Bath only began in earnest in the later seventeenth century. It became necessary to install a pump to allow patients to have access to the water directly from the spring and in the first years of the eighteenth century a doctor, William Oliver, persuaded the Bath Corporation to erect a building where the drinkers could be sheltered.  This is the origin of the first Pump Room completed in 1706.   As the popularity of the spa grew in the 18th century the Pump Room could no longer accommodate the fashionable crowds and invalids so extensions and improvements were made to the building. 

In the later eighteenth century, as more and more families came to Bath to take the waters, the Pump Room needed further work. In 1784 a lavatory was installed but then An Act of Parliament was obtained establishing Improvement Commissioners to improve the city centre and the architect, Thomas Baldwin, was appointed by them. Baldwin built New Private Baths adjacent to the Pump Room and in 1790 began work to build an entirely new one. Despite delays arising from Baldwin’s personal bankruptcy and dismissal, the project was completed by a new architect, John Palmer, in 1795 when it was opened by the Duchess of York. The wider scheme re-ordered the local streets, sweeping away medieval alleys and before his dismissal Baldwin completed Bath Street connecting the Pump Room to the two smaller springs known as the Hot Bath and the Cross Bath. 

The Pump Room continued as a fashionable meeting place to promenade and take the waters.  Jane Austen observed people and fashions from within the Pump Room, which features in her two novels ‘Northanger Abbey’ and ‘Persuasion’.

In 1897 John Brydon built another extension to the Pump Room which housed a Concert Hall, the present day Roman Baths Reception Hall, undoubtedly the finest Victorian interior in Bath.  Mary Shelley stayed at 5 Abbey Church Yard which was demolished to make room for the Reception Hall and it is thought that this is where her novel Frankenstein was written.

During the Victorian and Edwardian periods, the Pump Room was heavily furnished and during World War II it became a restaurant and fortunately escaped damage in the Baedeker air raids on Bath in 1942. Many interesting historical figures have visited the Pump Room and taken the waters including Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Buffalo Bill and Haile Selassie, not to mention present day royalty and celebrities.

Today, the Pump Room is a very popular venue for day time refreshments, and is also used for special occasions, corporate hospitality, concerts, weddings and as a favourite rendezvous for both local people and visitors to the city. 

18th Century view of the Pump Room
Pump Room, 1938

For more information about availability, fill out our short enquiry form or call us on 01225 477786.


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